Let Livestock Guardians Do Their Jobs!

One of our most important goals as an organization is to promote peaceful coexistence with wild animals. We strive to make sure that owners of livestock seek effective, nonlethal methods of protecting their herds. Instead of killing native predators— a futile, cruel, ineffective approach— many ranchers make the excellent decision to employ livestock guardian dogs.Continue reading “Let Livestock Guardians Do Their Jobs!”

Raccoons Don’t Wash Their Food. Here’s What They’re Really Doing!

Raccoons are famous for their tendency to “wash” their food, but they’re not washing anything at all! Raccoons aren’t exactly the most hygienic animals; they’ll often dip their food into the same body of water they use as a latrine (communal toilet). Ick! The reason for this behavior is actually much more interesting than youContinue reading “Raccoons Don’t Wash Their Food. Here’s What They’re Really Doing!”

Keep Owlets Safe: Don’t Use Rodent Poison

Baby owls, called owlets, just might be the cutest and strangest-looking creatures on Earth. They look like Mother Nature collected a year’s worth of dryer lint and then got creative with googly eyes and acrylic, possibly after having a couple of drinks. As much as we humans love owlets, no one loves them as muchContinue reading “Keep Owlets Safe: Don’t Use Rodent Poison”

Bats Make Scary Faces to “See” Better

A lot of people find bats creepy. There are a lot of reasons for this, such as their mythical association with vampires and ghouls. One thing that makes people nervous about bats is that their faces often look menacing and aggressive, like they’re threatening to bite. But this weird grimace isn’t what you think. WhenContinue reading “Bats Make Scary Faces to “See” Better”

Most American Squirrels Used to be Black

Black squirrels aren’t common anymore in the U.S., but you may still see them if you’re lucky! Believe it or not, there was a time that most squirrels in the U.S. had this interesting (and beautiful!) trait. Black coloration, or melanism, can occur in both fox squirrels and Eastern grey squirrels. Prior to European invasionContinue reading “Most American Squirrels Used to be Black”

Woodchucks Don’t Chuck, Chew, or Eat Wood

Centuries before any English speakers ever laid eyes on this animal, the Narragansett people of Rhode Island— an Algonquian tribe— called it a “wuchak.” This indigenous name likely shared roots with a similar Cree word meaning weasel or fisher. English speakers turned “wuchak” into “woodchuck,” leading not just to a popular tongue-twister, but a lotContinue reading “Woodchucks Don’t Chuck, Chew, or Eat Wood”