Category: Wildlife Emergencies

No Goat’s Milk for Wildlife

Wildlife rehabilitators routinely receive patients critically ill with anemia, diarrhea, nutrition-related hair loss, tooth decay, bloat, and other serious problems when people have tried to raise baby wild animals themselves. When we start taking information about the animal’s history, we all too often hear,…

What To Do About Tadpoles in Your Swimming Pool

Many frogs and toads breed in spring, which is also when you’re likely to start preparing your pool for summer. If your pool hasn’t been staying covered at all times (or if your pool cover has some rainwater pooled on top) there’s a chance…

Bobkitten or Regular Kitten?

Take a look at this kitten. This is a 100% domestic cat… not a bobcat, and not a hybrid! We were disappointed in some of the responses to Arwen the bobcat, who was brought to us by a well-meaning woman who had mistaken her…

What kind of wild puppy did I find?

If you’re lucky, you may spot a wild “puppy” of some kind in the wild one day. I’m the first few weeks of life, wild coyote pups, fox kits, and raccoon kits can look very similar and sometimes lack the very distinct traits that…

Don’t help an injured adult deer!

It’s hard to see an injured animal without stepping in to help. But in the case of adult deer, the best way to help is to step back. Deer are extremely susceptible to a strange, complex disorder called capture myopathy. When captured, many of…

Cottontail Mothers Feed Young Twice Daily

Cottontails don’t generally nest in burrows or dens, but in shallow depressions right in the middle of a forest of lawn. Predators are everywhere, but these babies stay safe while hidden in plain sight! That’s because mother cottontails have an impressive technique for keeping…

Dealing with Zombie Raccoons

Zombie raccoons aren’t rare. You may see a raccoon that is staggering, grunting, standing on its hind legs, and periodically collapsing into an unresponsive coma. It may even have glowing green eyes that appear blind. It looks terrifying, but there’s no need to hoard…

Found A Baby Raccoon? Don’t Touch!

Every year, wildlife rehabilitators, game wardens, and veterinarians are forced to euthanize hundreds of healthy raccoons. In most parts of the country, raccoons are considered rabies vector species. This does not mean that it is likely that they have rabies; only that they are…

I Found a Fawn! What now?

Babies like this are often kidnapped by well-meaning people who mistake them for orphans, but this baby doesn’t need help. Mother deer will often leave their babies alone for up to several hours a day, often hidden in underbrush, tall grass, or leaves. The…

Found a Dead Opossum? Check its Pouch!

Car collisions are a leading cause of death for adult opossums. When an opossum is terrified, it enters an involuntary comatose state (“playing possum”) and freezes in place. This is great for dissuading predators, but evolution didn’t prepare the opossum for automobiles. The good…