Don’t Relocate Skunks!

Well-meaning home owners often relocate skunks because they’re bothered by occasional whiffs of musk. It may seem like relocating an animal is a humane form of pest control, but it’s unfortunately not. Every year, thousands of mother skunks are taken away from their babies, who are left to die brutal, painful deaths by starvation. SkunksContinue reading “Don’t Relocate Skunks!”

Why Do You Rescue Vermin?

It’s an understandable question. To someone who’s had their attic destroyed by raccoons or their chickens tormented by foxes, the goals of For Fox Sake can seem unreasonable– or even downright irresponsible. So why rehabilitate animals that aren’t endangered? For Fox Sake handles skunks, foxes, and raccoons, which, in our state, are categorized as rabiesContinue reading “Why Do You Rescue Vermin?”

Tennessee’s Endangered Eastern Spotted Skunk

The Eastern spotted skunk, native to our region, has lost up to 99% of its population in the last seventy years. It is likely completely extinct through most of its natural range— including the region of Tennessee where For Fox Sake operates— and it could be completely extinct in the wild within a decade. AndContinue reading “Tennessee’s Endangered Eastern Spotted Skunk”

Why Do Rehabilitated Animals Have Ear Tags?

A lot of people are uncomfortable when they see ear tags on the animals here at For Fox Sake. And, believe me, I understand why. Animals in rehabilitation are not pets or livestock; they are meant to return to the wild one day. And it would be horrible to cause unnecessary pain to an animal.Continue reading “Why Do Rehabilitated Animals Have Ear Tags?”

On Following the Law, Even When it Hurts

I dedicate my life to caring for Tennessee’s native wildlife, and specialize in foxes, skunks, and raccoons, but unfortunately, there are hard limits on which animals I am allowed to save. In Tennessee, a fox, skunk, or raccoon can not be accepted for rehabilitation if it is over six months of age. This is becauseContinue reading “On Following the Law, Even When it Hurts”

Sick. Not “Friendly.”

Pretty much everyone wishes they could befriend a wild animal. It’s not at all uncommon for people to be excited when a wild fox or raccoon seems to randomly approach them without fear. It’s human nature to project that the animal is seeking comfort or companionship, and to fantasize about being able to provide exactlyContinue reading “Sick. Not “Friendly.””

I found a baby skunk! What now?

You look out your window and see a litter of skunk kits running around with no parent to be seen. What’s next? Kits without their mother aren’t necessarily orphaned or injured. However, unlike some animals, skunks are typically attentive parents who don’t leave their babies unattended for very long. If you wait about three hoursContinue reading “I found a baby skunk! What now?”