Scary Opossums!

Opossums have more teeth than any other land mammal, and when they’re scared, they like to use those scary-looking jaws to make themselves look intimidating. But don’t let this face fool you: opossums are actually very gentle, timid creatures who almost never bite or attack. They’re also naturally resistant (though not 100% immune) to rabies.Continue reading “Scary Opossums!”

No Safe Litter

We’ve all done it at some point: tossed a banana peel, apple core, or sandwich crust out of our car windows. Many people believe this is safe because food scraps are biodegradable. Unfortunately, food waste has become a leading cause of death for wildlife. When you toss food out the window, it attracts hungry animalsContinue reading “No Safe Litter”

Bobcats: Black Panthers in the South

Believe it or not, it’s possible see wild black panthers, like this one here, naturally in the Southeastern U.S. Although most commonly applied to leopards and jaguars, the term “black panther” can refer to any wild cat with the melanistic (black-colored) mutation. This beautiful fellow is a melanistic bobcat. Only thirteen have been conclusively confirmedContinue reading “Bobcats: Black Panthers in the South”

Cats Hunting Wildlife Isn’t Nature

House cats are the domesticated descendants of the African wildcat (Felis sylvestris lybica). Our native cats, here in the Southeastern United States, are bobcats and pumas. These animals hunt to survive, not for sport, and their natural prey is well-adapted to survive their predation. The Southern U.S. ecosystem is NOT adapted to handle the massiveContinue reading “Cats Hunting Wildlife Isn’t Nature”

The Black Coyotes of the South

Four hundred years ago, the forests of the Southeast came alive every night with the howls of red wolves. These beautiful creatures often carried the melanistic gene, which gave them jet-black fur. Researchers believe this was because it provided an advantage when hunting in dark, densely wooded areas during the night. Mass deforestation, hunting, andContinue reading “The Black Coyotes of the South”

Foxes: Not a Danger to Kids or Pets

An adult fox weighs, on average, five to twenty pounds— the same size range as a domestic cat. Foxes eat small, easy prey like mice, rats, voles, moles, and rabbits. A fox will never attempt to prey on another carnivore, especially one that is larger than itself. Essentially all cases of non-rabid foxes “attacking” cats,Continue reading “Foxes: Not a Danger to Kids or Pets”