Tag: wildlife rehabilitation

Can Barn Foxes Replace Barn Cats?

As strange as it may sound, “barn foxes” might be the solution of the future to rodent control in sustainable agriculture. It’s no secret that outdoor-roaming cats wreak havoc on native wildlife in the United States. In fact, multiple studies have demonstrated that outdoor…

Why Do You Rescue Vermin?

It’s an understandable question. To someone who’s had their attic destroyed by raccoons or their chickens tormented by foxes, the goals of For Fox Sake can seem unreasonable– or even downright irresponsible. So why rehabilitate animals that aren’t endangered? For Fox Sake handles skunks,…

Wild Animals Don’t Need Love

Good people, with good intentions, sentence animals to death every day with improper care. It’s terrible not just because the animals suffer, but because their well-meaning caregivers suffer, too. Rehabilitating wildlife properly takes more than just love and dedication, and more than you can…

Why Do Rehabilitated Animals Have Ear Tags?

A lot of people are uncomfortable when they see ear tags on the animals here at For Fox Sake. And, believe me, I understand why. Animals in rehabilitation are not pets or livestock; they are meant to return to the wild one day. And…

On Following the Law, Even When it Hurts

I dedicate my life to caring for Tennessee’s native wildlife, and specialize in foxes, skunks, and raccoons, but unfortunately, there are hard limits on which animals I am allowed to save. In Tennessee, a fox, skunk, or raccoon can not be accepted for rehabilitation…

Found a Dead Opossum? Check its Pouch!

Car collisions are a leading cause of death for adult opossums. When an opossum is terrified, it enters an involuntary comatose state (“playing possum”) and freezes in place. This is great for dissuading predators, but evolution didn’t prepare the opossum for automobiles. The good…

Why Won’t Rehabbers Answer Me?

It’s terrifying to have a wild animal in need of help, but to be unable to reach someone who can provide the care it needs. It’s no wonder that people sometimes get frustrated and even infuriated with wildlife rehabilitators, who might take hours or…

Tennessee Rehabilitators Can’t Save Bats

In Tennessee, even wildlife rehabiliators who are permitted to handle rabies vector species can NEVER accept a bat for rehabilitation. Although the state of Tennessee will allow specially licensed rehabbers to handle foxes, skunks, and raccoons, the handling of wild bats is strictly forbidden…

Why not let nature take its course?

This is a common and understandable question that wildlife rehabilitators receive. After all, death and disease are a very real, and important, part of the balance of the natural world. For the most part, wildlife rehabilitators do not intervene when nature is running its…

Why We Only Rescue Tennessee Wildlife

Since Chattanooga sits on the state line, our local rehabbers often get calls about animals from outside the state. I can advise about wildlife first-aid, help identify unknown critters, and help find solutions for people who want to humanly repel “nuisance” animals, regardless of…