I Found a Fawn! What now?

Babies like this are often kidnapped by well-meaning people who mistake them for orphans, but this baby doesn’t need help. Mother deer will often leave their babies alone for up to several hours a day, often hidden in underbrush, tall grass, or leaves. The fawn knows to lie down and be very still, to avoidContinue reading “I Found a Fawn! What now?”

Found a Dead Opossum? Check its Pouch!

Car collisions are a leading cause of death for adult opossums. When an opossum is terrified, it enters an involuntary comatose state (“playing possum”) and freezes in place. This is great for dissuading predators, but evolution didn’t prepare the opossum for automobiles. The good news is that, if you see a dead opossum, it mightContinue reading “Found a Dead Opossum? Check its Pouch!”

Fledglings Don’t Need Help

Especially in the spring and summer, you’re likely to see a baby bird awkwardly hobbling on the ground, barely able to fly, possibly crying for its mother. It’s understandable that many well-meaning people mistake these babies for orphans. They are actually doing just fine and are under their parents’ care! If a bird has feathersContinue reading “Fledglings Don’t Need Help”

Sick. Not “Friendly.”

Pretty much everyone wishes they could befriend a wild animal. It’s not at all uncommon for people to be excited when a wild fox or raccoon seems to randomly approach them without fear. It’s human nature to project that the animal is seeking comfort or companionship, and to fantasize about being able to provide exactlyContinue reading “Sick. Not “Friendly.””

I found a baby skunk! What now?

You look out your window and see a litter of skunk kits running around with no parent to be seen. What’s next? Kits without their mother aren’t necessarily orphaned or injured. However, unlike some animals, skunks are typically attentive parents who don’t leave their babies unattended for very long. If you wait about three hoursContinue reading “I found a baby skunk! What now?”

Capture Myopathy: The Risks of Picking Up Wildlife

Wild animals— particularly rabbits, fawns, and birds— are prone to a condition called capture myopathy. This is a complex disorder that results from the stress of being chased, captured, or even simply held by a human being. Although there are usually no signs of disease or injury, these animals simply die. Please: never capture orContinue reading “Capture Myopathy: The Risks of Picking Up Wildlife”

Why Won’t Rehabbers Answer Me?

It’s terrifying to have a wild animal in need of help, but to be unable to reach someone who can provide the care it needs. It’s no wonder that people sometimes get frustrated and even infuriated with wildlife rehabilitators, who might take hours or even days to return a phone call. Many people envision wildlifeContinue reading “Why Won’t Rehabbers Answer Me?”

I Found a Rabid Raccoon! Help!

“Help! I found a rabid raccoon!” This is one of the most frequent— and panicked— calls we receive in wildlife rehabilitation. If it happens to you, here’s what to do: -First, stay calm. The animal probably isn’t actually rabid. Raccoons can be awake in the daytime for any number of reasons. If it looks healthy,Continue reading “I Found a Rabid Raccoon! Help!”