Tag: rabies

Your “pet” raccoon will be killed. It’s your fault.

Folks, we need to have a talk. This isn’t a pleasant, cute, or cuddly talk, but it’s one that we Tennessean animal lovers need to have. I get calls all the time from people who find baby raccoons and, instead of calling a qualified…

For Fox Sake Supports Vaccines!

Our recent post about the USDA’s oral rabies vaccine generated a lot of controversy! Commenters made claims that— among other things— rabies vaccines spread rabies and contain ground-up human baby parts. The oral rabies vaccine is distributed by the USDA, not For Fox Sake,…

Should We Kill Foxes to Prevent Rabies?

Do you kill random humans, just in case they have ebola? Foxes, skunks, and raccoons are routinely killed because of their reputation as rabies vectors. While rabies is a problem, destroying healthy animals does absolutely nothing to control the spread of disease. It just…

Why Do You Rescue Vermin?

It’s an understandable question. To someone who’s had their attic destroyed by raccoons or their chickens tormented by foxes, the goals of For Fox Sake can seem unreasonable– or even downright irresponsible. So why rehabilitate animals that aren’t endangered? For Fox Sake handles skunks,…

Tennessee’s Endangered Eastern Spotted Skunk

The Eastern spotted skunk, native to our region, has lost up to 99% of its population in the last seventy years. It is likely completely extinct through most of its natural range— including the region of Tennessee where For Fox Sake operates— and it…

Dealing with Zombie Raccoons

Zombie raccoons aren’t rare. You may see a raccoon that is staggering, grunting, standing on its hind legs, and periodically collapsing into an unresponsive coma. It may even have glowing green eyes that appear blind. It looks terrifying, but there’s no need to hoard…

Found A Baby Raccoon? Don’t Touch!

Every year, wildlife rehabilitators, game wardens, and veterinarians are forced to euthanize hundreds of healthy raccoons. In most parts of the country, raccoons are considered rabies vector species. This does not mean that it is likely that they have rabies; only that they are…

Don’t Befriend Raccoons

It’s not uncommon for people to attempt to befriend wildlife. They start by leaving food on their steps, then offering food by hand, then eventually petting and even holding the animal. It sounds like a magical experience, but this temporarily rewarding moment can be…

Do Opossums Spread Disease?

Opossums look a little bit like huge rats, so they’ve been mistakenly associated with disease. But, with very few exceptions, opossums can’t and don’t carry the same viruses that infect humans and pets. An opossum’s normal body temperature is typically around 93-94 degrees, and…

Is a Coyote Likely to Have Rabies?

Fear of rabies are one of the most common reasons that people kill coyotes. While it’s certainly not a good idea to approach, provoke, or handle any wild animal, coyotes are actually one of the less likely carriers of rabies in the United States….