Category: Rehabilitation

“Coats for Cubs” Gives Fur Back to Animals

In 2019, For Fox Sake will be participating in the Coats for Cubs program organized by Buffalo Exchange! There’s no way to give fur back to the animal that was born wearing it, but this program is certainly a step in the right direction….

Why Do You Rescue Vermin?

It’s an understandable question. To someone who’s had their attic destroyed by raccoons or their chickens tormented by foxes, the goals of For Fox Sake can seem unreasonable– or even downright irresponsible. So why rehabilitate animals that aren’t endangered? For Fox Sake handles skunks,…

Wild Animals Don’t Need Love

Good people, with good intentions, sentence animals to death every day with improper care. It’s terrible not just because the animals suffer, but because their well-meaning caregivers suffer, too. Rehabilitating wildlife properly takes more than just love and dedication, and more than you can…

Why Do Rehabilitated Animals Have Ear Tags?

A lot of people are uncomfortable when they see ear tags on the animals here at For Fox Sake. And, believe me, I understand why. Animals in rehabilitation are not pets or livestock; they are meant to return to the wild one day. And…

On Following the Law, Even When it Hurts

I dedicate my life to caring for Tennessee’s native wildlife, and specialize in foxes, skunks, and raccoons, but unfortunately, there are hard limits on which animals I am allowed to save. In Tennessee, a fox, skunk, or raccoon can not be accepted for rehabilitation…

Capture Myopathy: The Risks of Picking Up Wildlife

Wild animals— particularly rabbits, fawns, and birds— are prone to a condition called capture myopathy. This is a complex disorder that results from the stress of being chased, captured, or even simply held by a human being. Although there are usually no signs of…

Why Won’t Rehabbers Answer Me?

It’s terrifying to have a wild animal in need of help, but to be unable to reach someone who can provide the care it needs. It’s no wonder that people sometimes get frustrated and even infuriated with wildlife rehabilitators, who might take hours or…

Tennessee Rehabilitators Can’t Save Bats

In Tennessee, even wildlife rehabiliators who are permitted to handle rabies vector species can NEVER accept a bat for rehabilitation. Although the state of Tennessee will allow specially licensed rehabbers to handle foxes, skunks, and raccoons, the handling of wild bats is strictly forbidden…

Foxes are Bad Pets

The desire to own a fox as a pet is understandable, but the capture, breeding, and selling of pet foxes isn’t fair to them. With the exception of domesticated Siberian silver foxes, which are not sold in the United States, foxes are wild animals…

Raccoons: Terrible Pets

Every year between August and November, wildlife rehabilitators start getting dozens of calls: “I’ve been raising this raccoon as a pet and it’s gone crazy.” Raccoons make great pets until some time between five and twelve months of age. Then, every wild instinct they…