A peaceful end for suffering wildlife

Some wildlife rescues choose not to share stories about animals that can’t be saved, because they don’t want to upset the public. While I respect that, I believe there’s bittersweet beauty in all we do, even in the cases that end in death. The reality is that most of the calls I’ve received this yearContinue reading “A peaceful end for suffering wildlife”

Wild Animals Don’t Need Love

Good people, with good intentions, sentence animals to death every day with improper care. It’s terrible not just because the animals suffer, but because their well-meaning caregivers suffer, too. Rehabilitating wildlife properly takes more than just love and dedication, and more than you can learn from a weekend crash-course on Google. To actually thrive onContinue reading “Wild Animals Don’t Need Love”

Dealing with Zombie Raccoons

Zombie raccoons aren’t rare. You may see a raccoon that is staggering, grunting, standing on its hind legs, and periodically collapsing into an unresponsive coma. It may even have glowing green eyes that appear blind. It looks terrifying, but there’s no need to hoard canned food and ammo. This “zombie syndrome” is caused by canineContinue reading “Dealing with Zombie Raccoons”

Found A Baby Raccoon? Don’t Touch!

Every year, wildlife rehabilitators, game wardens, and veterinarians are forced to euthanize hundreds of healthy raccoons. In most parts of the country, raccoons are considered rabies vector species. This does not mean that it is likely that they have rabies; only that they are at a greater risk than, say, a rabbit or goat. BecauseContinue reading “Found A Baby Raccoon? Don’t Touch!”

I Found a Fawn! What now?

Babies like this are often kidnapped by well-meaning people who mistake them for orphans, but this baby doesn’t need help. Mother deer will often leave their babies alone for up to several hours a day, often hidden in underbrush, tall grass, or leaves. The fawn knows to lie down and be very still, to avoidContinue reading “I Found a Fawn! What now?”

Found a Dead Opossum? Check its Pouch!

Car collisions are a leading cause of death for adult opossums. When an opossum is terrified, it enters an involuntary comatose state (“playing possum”) and freezes in place. This is great for dissuading predators, but evolution didn’t prepare the opossum for automobiles. The good news is that, if you see a dead opossum, it mightContinue reading “Found a Dead Opossum? Check its Pouch!”

Can I Move Wild Baby Rabbits?

Many people call wildlife rescues asking for help rescuing or relocating cottontail rabbits found in their yards. While it’s wonderful that so many people want to protect wild bunnies, the best way to keep them safe is to simply leave them exactly where they are. Cottontail mothers are not particularly attentive, and only come toContinue reading “Can I Move Wild Baby Rabbits?”

When is a Cottontail Independent?

Mother cottontails only feed their babies twice a day, and a rarely seen. But, even if a baby cottontail is definitely orphaned, it does not necessarily need help. Once a bunny is the size of a softball, it no longer needs its mother’s care and shouldn’t be captured or “rescued.” Cottontail rabbits are extremely sensitiveContinue reading “When is a Cottontail Independent?”

Fledglings Don’t Need Help

Especially in the spring and summer, you’re likely to see a baby bird awkwardly hobbling on the ground, barely able to fly, possibly crying for its mother. It’s understandable that many well-meaning people mistake these babies for orphans. They are actually doing just fine and are under their parents’ care! If a bird has feathersContinue reading “Fledglings Don’t Need Help”