Dealing with Zombie Raccoons

Zombie raccoons aren’t rare. You may see a raccoon that is staggering, grunting, standing on its hind legs, and periodically collapsing into an unresponsive coma. It may even have glowing green eyes that appear blind. It looks terrifying, but there’s no need to hoard canned food and ammo. This “zombie syndrome” is caused by canineContinue reading “Dealing with Zombie Raccoons”

Why Do Rehabilitated Animals Have Ear Tags?

A lot of people are uncomfortable when they see ear tags on the animals here at For Fox Sake. And, believe me, I understand why. Animals in rehabilitation are not pets or livestock; they are meant to return to the wild one day. And it would be horrible to cause unnecessary pain to an animal.Continue reading “Why Do Rehabilitated Animals Have Ear Tags?”

Found A Baby Raccoon? Don’t Touch!

Every year, wildlife rehabilitators, game wardens, and veterinarians are forced to euthanize hundreds of healthy raccoons. In most parts of the country, raccoons are considered rabies vector species. This does not mean that it is likely that they have rabies; only that they are at a greater risk than, say, a rabbit or goat. BecauseContinue reading “Found A Baby Raccoon? Don’t Touch!”

Don’t Befriend Raccoons

It’s not uncommon for people to attempt to befriend wildlife. They start by leaving food on their steps, then offering food by hand, then eventually petting and even holding the animal. It sounds like a magical experience, but this temporarily rewarding moment can be a death sentence for the animal. Raccoons in particular are atContinue reading “Don’t Befriend Raccoons”

How Do I Get Raccoons to Leave My Attic?

For the next few months, raccoons all over the country will be desperately looking for places to have their young. If there’s an opening that allows a mother-to-be into an attic, she will understandably think that this warm, dry shelter is a perfect place to raise her new babies. But what happens when the homeownerContinue reading “How Do I Get Raccoons to Leave My Attic?”

On Following the Law, Even When it Hurts

I dedicate my life to caring for Tennessee’s native wildlife, and specialize in foxes, skunks, and raccoons, but unfortunately, there are hard limits on which animals I am allowed to save. In Tennessee, a fox, skunk, or raccoon can not be accepted for rehabilitation if it is over six months of age. This is becauseContinue reading “On Following the Law, Even When it Hurts”

Sick. Not “Friendly.”

Pretty much everyone wishes they could befriend a wild animal. It’s not at all uncommon for people to be excited when a wild fox or raccoon seems to randomly approach them without fear. It’s human nature to project that the animal is seeking comfort or companionship, and to fantasize about being able to provide exactlyContinue reading “Sick. Not “Friendly.””

Red Raccoons?

This raccoon’s beautiful coat is caused by erythrism, a genetic condition that causes reddish pigmentation of the fur and skin. Erythrism in raccoons usually runs in families. It isn’t harmful and, other than making them more likely targets for fur trappers, erythrism doesn’t affect a raccoon’s life expectancy.

Is It Bad To Feed Raccoons?

I would never be upset with anyone who is trying to help wildlife. I love Tennessee’s native wildlife so much that I’m dedicating my life to protecting them. If you follow For Fox Sake, you obviously care, too. For many wildlife lovers, feeding raccoons and other animals seems like a great way to give yourContinue reading “Is It Bad To Feed Raccoons?”